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Tiger Woods didn’t need another Masters to cement his GOAT status. What’s his legacy now?

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Tiger Woods was already the GOAT.

Despite the fact that, up until Sunday afternoon, he was four majors behind Jack Nicklaus for most all time, Tiger as the greatest was already a foregone conclusion to golf fans everywhere.

But then the 2019 Masters happened. Tiger Woods, at the age of 43, came from behind and won at Augusta for a fifth time. He’s now three behind tying the Golden Bear. Even typing it on a Monday morning seems surreal.

Suddenly, everything is possible. Even at his age — it’s rare but not unheard of to win in your mid-to-late 40s, just ask Nicklaus — he could have a shot once again at besting Nickalus’s record. He’s now two PGA Tour wins away from passing Sam Snead for most all-time.



And this is all in play after the greatest comeback in sports history — from what unfolded after his SUV crash to the seemingly endless back surgeries, to the time off necessary to heal to the tinkering with all facets of his game to account for the toll the game has taken on his body.

Woods also accomplished this in the face of Tigermania 2.0, with all the attention on him whenever he swings a club. He did it by besting the world’s No. 1 (Dustin Johnson), the hottest golfer over the past year (Francesco Molinari), the guy who’s won three majors in a two-year span (Brooks Koepka) and a host of other talents.



Seriously: What superlatives are there left to use? What if he wins another FOUR MAJORS after age 43? Should we be calling him the GOAT athlete ever to compete, better than names like Michael Jordan, Wayne Gretzky, Serena Williams, Lionel Messi, Michael Phelps and Tom Brady, all of whom you could argue he might have passed already?

I don’t know the answer. That’s how nuts this whole thing is. We have to scrap his legacy, rewrite it again and find a way to put it into words. And that could happen a few more times before the Big Cat hangs up his spikes.



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